Five Things You Can Do Right Now To Grow Your Photography Business

I love Twitter. I have learned more about photography as a business, an art form, and a hobby in the few months I’ve been active on Twitter than all the previous years surfing the web. Today, thanks to a “re-tweet” from Blackstar and Leafimaging of a blog entry from  ScottBourne, I received an “ah-ha” moment for my photography business.

Of the 5 things Scott lists in his article, #1 really hit home for me:

1. Own Your Own Zip Code

Don’t spend another second worrying about becoming a nationally-known photo rock star. Don’t worry about breaking out onto the national photo speaking circuit. Don’t worry about trying to get on Oprah. Just worry about owning your own zip code. It doesn’t matter where you live, YOU should be the photographer that everyone knows and talks about in your own zip code….

There are more great tips in Scott’s blog entry, but that one made me pause and think about my business approach. I live in a very nice neighborhood with 100+ families. The average home price in that neighborhood is around $215,000.  Why have I not “owned my neighborhood”, much less my zip code?

Last night at the gym I had a marketing/advertising “ah-ha”, and this morning, thanks to Twitter, I had another one.

1 Comment
  1. “Why have I not “owned my neighborhood”, much less my zip code?”

    Because you don’t want to be a pest. I’m not suggesting that you would be, but I think it’s human nature. We don’t want to create any kind of tension between us and our neighbors, so you hate to ask for their business. Some people might feel pressured to buy from you because you’re a neighbor/friend. You (or I) might worry about failure. I mean, if you blow a family portrait shoot, word of mouth can travel quickly in a small community. The flip side is also true, though. If you provide excellent customer service and competent portraits…folks will be BEGGING for you to shoot them. I say go for it! You’ve gotta start somewhere, and it might as well be close.

    The only restriction that I see this technique presenting is that your zip code will determine the type of photography you do. If you live in the suburbs, you’ll be unlikely to get a lot of fashion marketing work. If you live in an industrial park, you’ll have fewer portrait clients. If your photo business is all about being a job, then maybe that’s fine. But if your photography is about art/passion/creativity, then that could be tough.

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